Gender, SOGIESC & Migration in the Global Compact for Migration and the 2030 Agenda: Frameworks Matrix
Developed by IOM Regional Office Vienna for South-Eastern
Europe, Eastern Europe and Central Asia
Gender, SOGIESC & Migration in the Global Compact for Migration and the 2030 Agenda: Frameworks Matrix
Developed by IOM Regional Office Vienna for South-Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe and Central Asia

SDG Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

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Gender Equality

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Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation.

Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate.

Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws.

SDG Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Empowering women and promoting gender equality is crucial to accelerating sustainable development. Ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls is not only a basic human right, but it also has a multiplier effect across all other development areas. There are still gross inequalities in access to paid employment in some regions, and significant gaps between men and women in the labour market. Sexual violence and exploitation, the unequal division of unpaid care and domestic work, and discrimination in public decision making, all remain huge barriers. Gender equality is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. An integrated approach is crucial for progress across the multiple goals.

Objectives

GCM Cross-cutting and interdependent guiding principle: gender-responsive

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The Global Compact ensures that the human rights of women, men, girls and boys are respected at all stages of migration, that their specific needs are properly understood and addressed and that they are empowered as agents of change. It mainstreams a gender perspective and promotes gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls, recognizing their independence, agency and leadership in order to move away from addressing migrant women primarily through a lens of victimhood".

Renate Held

IOM Regional Director

Foreword

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Forewords

×

Renate Held
IOM Regional Director

Regional Director
Regional Office for South-Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia
International Organization for Migration
Vienna, Austria

At IOM, we value and actively promote diversity. We know it is one of the strengths that enables us to better rise up to the complex challenges of migration. As an organisation we have implemented a number of measures to increase gender equality and the empowerment of women, yet there is no room for complacency.

IOM recognises that our objective of safe, orderly, and regular migration can only be met if gender equality is lived and applied across all our work. Gender is central to the causes and consequences of migration. A person’s sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) shape every stage of the migration experience, from the reasons that lead to them taking the decision to migrate, to the particular risks and vulnerabilities which can be shaped by a person’s gender.

Lack of access to livelihood opportunities can disproportionately impact persons with diverse SOGIESC and create an impetus for migration as well as contribute to poor socio-economic outcomes at destination countries. Gender equality and the empowerment of women must be a critical topic in our dealings with governments and partners. IOM and the United Nations as a whole need to do more for gender equality. Translating policy into practice requires a leadership shift, strong commitment, and continuous investments going forward.

IOM, together with our UN partners and stakeholders at large, are devoted to achieving equality through our policies, programmes, and initiatives. Moreover, as the entire United Nations system strengthen their reporting focus on gender equality, in a similar vein, IOM’s policies and endeavours also promote results reporting in relation to gender equality. Since 2012, IOM has committed to implementing the UN System-Wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-SWAP), an accountability framework that applied to the entire UN system.

As we strive to ensure the specific needs and concerns of different gender groups and of different ages, are duly considered, I am pleased to launch the Gender, SOGIESC & Migration in the Global Compact for Migration and the 2030 Agenda: Frameworks Matrix designed to support gender mainstreaming across our projects and programmes. The publication illustrates how including gender considerations contributes to achieving the goals, objectives, and commitments of the Agenda 2030’s Sustainable Development Goals; those of the Global Compact for Safe Orderly and Regular Migration; as well as those of other international frameworks. I hope this Frameworks Matrix becomes a key reference point for you and that it helps you to navigate the important interlinkages between gender and migration in your work.

Amr Taha

Senior Regional Liaison and Policy Officer, Regional Gender Focal Point

Remarks from RO Vienna

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Forewords

×

Amr Taha
Senior Regional Liaison and Policy Officer Regional Gender Focal Point

Senior Regional Liaison and Policy Officer, and Regional Gender Focal Point
Regional Office for South-Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia
International Organization for Migration
Vienna, Austria

Gender Equality means equal rights, responsibilities, and opportunities of all individuals, not depending on one’s sex assigned at birth, physical sex characteristics, gender assigned by society, gender identity or gender expression. Gender equality also implies that the interests, needs and priorities of all individuals should be taken into consideration (see IOM SOGIESC Full Glossary of Terms). Despite the political discourse and narratives, it is indisputable that migration will not only continue to shape economies and societies in the years ahead, but it will define them in many more ways. The United Nations calculates that between 2000 and 2020 the total number of international migrants has grown by 49 per cent, reaching 3.4 per cent of the world’s population, surpassing the global population growth rate of 23 per cent. It is thus increasingly important that all migrants, regardless of gender are afforded the opportunity to be equal participants in their home, their community, and the society at large. Since joining the United Nations, IOM - as the designated Coordinator and Secretariat of the Global Compact for Migration, and a member of the UN Sustainable Development Group - is able to demonstrate its obligation and responsibility in achieving gender equality particularly, but not only, through a migration lens. It is our sincerest hope that this document helps you better articulate the interlinkages between the various frameworks to achieve just that.

Introduction

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development recognizes that migration is a powerful driver of sustainable development, for migrants and their communities. It brings significant benefits in the form of skills, strengthening the labour force, investment and cultural diversity, and contributes to improving the lives of communities in their countries of origin through the transfer of skills and financial resources. Migration is specifically referenced in in Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 10.7 under the goal to reduce inequalities and to “facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies”. Nevertheless, migration is a cross-cutting issue relevant to all of the SDGs. Further, the SDG’s motto to “leave no one behind” is a clear call for sustainable development to be inclusive, including for migrants.

Both the GCM and the 2030 Agenda recognize that equal rights, responsibilities and opportunities of all individuals regardless of gender are critical to ensure safe, regular and orderly migration, and indispensable for sustainable development. It is crucial to understand how gender interacts with migration and to respond accordingly. Gender influences reasons for migrating, who migrates and to where, how people migrate and the networks they use, opportunities and resources available at destinations, and relations with the country of origin. Risks, vulnerabilities and needs are also shaped in large part by one’s gender, and often vary drastically for different groups. The roles, expectations, relationships and power dynamics associated with being a man, woman, boy or girl, and whether one identifies as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or intersex (LGBTI), significantly affect all aspects of the migration process, and can also be affected in new ways by migration.

The language used to describe sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) varies greatly across the world and is dependent on such factors as location, language, age, gender and cultural references. However, there are some terms commonly used within the international context. We recognize that many of these terms are of Western origin, and that, in particular, the terms lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer represent concepts of personal identity that are not universal. Many people use other terms, or no terms, and it is critical to respect the autonomy of individuals in defining their own identities.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development recognizes that migration is a powerful driver of sustainable development, for migrants and their communities. It brings significant benefits in the form of skills, strengthening the labour force, investment and cultural diversity, and contributes to improving the lives of communities in their countries of origin through the transfer of skills and financial resources. Migration is specifically referenced in in Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 10.7 under the goal to reduce inequalities and to “facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies”. Nevertheless, migration is a cross-cutting issue relevant to all of the SDGs. Further, the SDG’s motto to “leave no one behind” is a clear call for sustainable development to be inclusive, including for migrants...

Read More

SDG Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Read More

Gender Equality

×

Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation.

Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate.

Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws.

SDG Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Empowering women and promoting gender equality is crucial to accelerating sustainable development. Ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls is not only a basic human right, but it also has a multiplier effect across all other development areas. There are still gross inequalities in access to paid employment in some regions, and significant gaps between men and women in the labour market. Sexual violence and exploitation, the unequal division of unpaid care and domestic work, and discrimination in public decision making, all remain huge barriers. Gender equality is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. An integrated approach is crucial for progress across the multiple goals.

Objectives

GCM Cross-cutting and interdependent guiding principle: gender-responsive

Read More
Read Less

The Global Compact ensures that the human rights of women, men, girls and boys are respected at all stages of migration, that their specific needs are properly understood and addressed and that they are empowered as agents of change. It mainstreams a gender perspective and promotes gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls, recognizing their independence, agency and leadership in order to move away from addressing migrant women primarily through a lens of victimhood".

Renate Held

IOM Regional Director

Read More

Forewords

×

Renate Held
IOM Regional Director

Regional Director
Regional Office for South-Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia
International Organization for Migration
Vienna, Austria

At IOM, we value and actively promote diversity. We know it is one of the strengths that enables us to better rise up to the complex challenges of migration. As an organisation we have implemented a number of measures to increase gender equality and the empowerment of women, yet there is no room for complacency.

IOM recognises that our objective of safe, orderly, and regular migration can only be met if gender equality is lived and applied across all our work. Gender is central to the causes and consequences of migration. A person’s sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) shape every stage of the migration experience, from the reasons that lead to them taking the decision to migrate, to the particular risks and vulnerabilities which can be shaped by a person’s gender.

Lack of access to livelihood opportunities can disproportionately impact persons with diverse SOGIESC and create an impetus for migration as well as contribute to poor socio-economic outcomes at destination countries. Gender equality and the empowerment of women must be a critical topic in our dealings with governments and partners. IOM and the United Nations as a whole need to do more for gender equality. Translating policy into practice requires a leadership shift, strong commitment, and continuous investments going forward.

IOM, together with our UN partners and stakeholders at large, are devoted to achieving equality through our policies, programmes, and initiatives. Moreover, as the entire United Nations system strengthen their reporting focus on gender equality, in a similar vein, IOM’s policies and endeavours also promote results reporting in relation to gender equality. Since 2012, IOM has committed to implementing the UN System-Wide Action Plan on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-SWAP), an accountability framework that applied to the entire UN system.

As we strive to ensure the specific needs and concerns of different gender groups and of different ages, are duly considered, I am pleased to launch the Gender, SOGIESC & Migration in the Global Compact for Migration and the 2030 Agenda: Frameworks Matrix designed to support gender mainstreaming across our projects and programmes. The publication illustrates how including gender considerations contributes to achieving the goals, objectives, and commitments of the Agenda 2030’s Sustainable Development Goals; those of the Global Compact for Safe Orderly and Regular Migration; as well as those of other international frameworks. I hope this Frameworks Matrix becomes a key reference point for you and that it helps you to navigate the important interlinkages between gender and migration in your work.

Amr Taha

Senior Regional Liaison and Policy Officer, Regional Gender Focal Point

Read More

Remarks from RO Vienna

×

Amr Taha
Senior Regional Liaison and Policy Officer Regional Gender Focal Point

Senior Regional Liaison and Policy Officer, and Regional Gender Focal Point
Regional Office for South-Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia
International Organization for Migration
Vienna, Austria

Gender Equality means equal rights, responsibilities, and opportunities of all individuals, not depending on one’s sex assigned at birth, physical sex characteristics, gender assigned by society, gender identity or gender expression. Gender equality also implies that the interests, needs and priorities of all individuals should be taken into consideration (see IOM SOGIESC Full Glossary of Terms). Despite the political discourse and narratives, it is indisputable that migration will not only continue to shape economies and societies in the years ahead, but it will define them in many more ways. The United Nations calculates that between 2000 and 2020 the total number of international migrants has grown by 49 per cent, reaching 3.4 per cent of the world’s population, surpassing the global population growth rate of 23 per cent. It is thus increasingly important that all migrants, regardless of gender are afforded the opportunity to be equal participants in their home, their community, and the society at large. Since joining the United Nations, IOM - as the designated Coordinator and Secretariat of the Global Compact for Migration, and a member of the UN Sustainable Development Group - is able to demonstrate its obligation and responsibility in achieving gender equality particularly, but not only, through a migration lens. It is our sincerest hope that this document helps you better articulate the interlinkages between the various frameworks to achieve just that.

SDG Goals